• My language to do list

    From Deavmi@KK4QBN to DOVE-Net.Programming on Wednesday, March 22, 2017 19:07:56
    I thought it would be a good idea to put toghether a to-do ist of
    languages to learn.

    For me I think starting at an easy high-level language like Java or
    Python is the way to go and then you work your way down to lower level languages.

    This is my hierachy of order in which I want to learn them:

    - Java
    - Python
    - D
    - C++
    - C
    - Put Free Pascal in here cause why not (I looks nice and I have played
    around with it)

    I find the last two can be interchangeable. I would probably do C first
    then CPP to understand the core of C++ (I know they are different
    languages but still).

    For me I feel like that is a good list. I think D could have Nim go
    alongside with it but D for me is the better choice as of now.

    Anyway, I am going to be busy doing a lot of computer sciency stuff this holiday and that starts with Java - then through the years I will get to
    the others (Python and D can be done this year as well as I know Python
    pretty well and D is really simple).

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  • From Deavmi@KK4QBN to Deavmi on Wednesday, March 22, 2017 21:58:47
    On 2017-03-22 07:07 PM, Deavmi wrote:
    I thought it would be a good idea to put toghether a to-do ist of
    languages to learn.

    For me I think starting at an easy high-level language like Java or
    Python is the way to go and then you work your way down to lower level languages.

    This is my hierachy of order in which I want to learn them:

    - Java
    - Python
    - D
    - C++
    - C
    - Put Free Pascal in here cause why not (I looks nice and I have
    played around with it)

    I find the last two can be interchangeable. I would probably do C first
    then CPP to understand the core of C++ (I know they are different
    languages but still).

    For me I feel like that is a good list. I think D could have Nim go
    alongside with it but D for me is the better choice as of now.

    Anyway, I am going to be busy doing a lot of computer sciency stuff this holiday and that starts with Java - then through the years I will get to
    the others (Python and D can be done this year as well as I know Python pretty well and D is really simple).

    The reason I mention Free Pascal and even C is because I like old
    languages (C is useful though) but I'd like to learn Pascal and see and
    do things how they did back in the day. Plus, it isn't actually useless.

    ---
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  • From jagossel@KK4QBN to Deavmi on Wednesday, March 22, 2017 22:09:54
    Re: My language to do list
    By: Deavmi to DOVE-Net.Programming on Wed Mar 22 2017 07:07 pm

    I thought it would be a good idea to put toghether a to-do ist of
    languages to learn.

    For me I think starting at an easy high-level language like Java or
    Python is the way to go and then you work your way down to lower level languages.

    For me, it isn't more of languages, but frameworks and stacks. As far as langiages go:
    - FreeBASIC
    - Ruby
    - Visual Basic (catch up)
    - C++

    Can't you tell that I have a soft spot for BASIC dialects? :)

    Now, as far as frameworks and stacks goes:
    - Docker
    - MEAN

    I have an idea for my first containerized microservice, but the lack of time prevents me from actually working on it. Also, it only fills a special niche that I can only see maybe one or two other people who could use it.
    -jag
    Code it, script it, automate it!

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  • From Deavmi@KK4QBN to jagossel on Thursday, March 23, 2017 02:02:19
    My interests are languages themself. I want to be a language designer and also work on Internet protocols. Therefore I'd so my language choice above is great.

    Maybe I will try out Common Lisp oneday but it isn't a must.

    +==========+

    Regards,
    Tristan B. Kildaire (Deavmi)

    Email: deavmi@ewbbs.synchro.net; deavmi@kk4qbn.synchro.net

    +==========+

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  • From Ennev@MTLGEEK to Deavmi on Thursday, March 23, 2017 12:34:55
    - Put Free Pascal in here cause why not (I looks nice and I have played around with it)

    Pascal still has a special place in my hart, having work with it so many
    years, with Lazarus ( http://www.lazarus-ide.or. ) you get a free multi-platform devellopement environement that enable you to write code and port it easily on multi platform .

    But honestly it might have lost a lot of traction.

    Myself I'm considering swift for my next project since now it's been open sourced by apple and IBM is porting it to cloud applications. And it's fast.

    Just my 2 cents

    ---
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  • From Deavmi@KK4QBN to Ennev on Thursday, March 23, 2017 19:14:36
    On 2017-03-23 06:34 PM, Ennev wrote:
    - Put Free Pascal in here cause why not (I looks nice and I have played around with it)

    Pascal still has a special place in my hart, having work with it so many years, with Lazarus ( http://www.lazarus-ide.or. ) you get a free multi-platform devellopement environement that enable you to write code and port it easily on multi platform .

    But honestly it might have lost a lot of traction.

    Myself I'm considering swift for my next project since now it's been open sourced by apple and IBM is porting it to cloud applications. And it's fast.

    Just my 2 cents

    ---
    � Synchronet � MtlGeek - Geeks in Montreal - http://mtlgeek.com/ -

    What about D? Nim? (I just don't really want to get involved with Swift,
    not that I have anything against it but I like other languages).

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  • From Vk3jed@FREEWAY to Ennev on Friday, March 24, 2017 06:54:00
    Ennev wrote to Deavmi <=-

    Pascal still has a special place in my hart, having work with it so
    many years, with Lazarus ( http://www.lazarus-ide.or. ) you get a free multi-platform devellopement environement that enable you to write code and port it easily on multi platform .

    My Pascal goes back to the days of DOS and Turbo Pascal. Actually, no, back to TP3 on CP/M. :) I have a soft spot for Pascal as well, and the path of least resistance for me will be relearning Pascal using FPC/Lazarus.


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  • From Ennev@MTLGEEK to Deavmi on Thursday, March 23, 2017 17:18:06

    Maybe I will try out Common Lisp oneday but it isn't a must.

    Remember Lisp from the day I was develloping tool for autocad. That was fun I like working with stack.

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  • From Ennev@MTLGEEK to Deavmi on Thursday, March 23, 2017 17:29:55
    What about D? Nim? (I just don't really want to get involved with Swift,
    not that I have anything against it but I like other languages).

    Hear of D not familiar with nim. Will check.

    For someone who want to learn a pure object oriented language smallTalk is a good place to look to. The concept you lean there is usefull when you go to other OO language like java, c# etc.

    In the period I was using, smallTalk was written like 90% in smallTalk.

    something like :

    1 + 2

    is actually interpreted as something like this:

    An object of the type number with the property of 1 is sent a message called "+" ( you can see it as a method ) passing as a parameter an object of type number with the property of 2

    in smallTalk everything is either an object or a message to it.

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  • From Ennev@MTLGEEK to Vk3jed on Thursday, March 23, 2017 18:41:38
    My Pascal goes back to the days of DOS and Turbo Pascal. Actually, no,
    back to TP3 on CP/M. :) I have a soft spot for Pascal as well, and the
    path of least resistance for me will be relearning Pascal using
    FPC/Lazarus.

    Wow. I believed that turbo pascal was a dos only product. It was in cp/m too! Cool

    ---
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  • From Vk3jed@FREEWAY to Ennev on Friday, March 24, 2017 20:32:00
    Ennev wrote to Vk3jed <=-

    Wow. I believed that turbo pascal was a dos only product. It was in
    cp/m too! Cool

    Yes, TP 3 was the last version available for CP/M I used it on both the Apple // (with Z80 Softcard) and the Microbee (an Australian Z80 based machine).


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  • From Deavmi@KK4QBN to Ennev on Saturday, March 25, 2017 03:15:00
    Re: Re: My language to do list
    By: Ennev to Deavmi on Thu Mar 23 2017 05:29 pm

    What about D? Nim? (I just don't really want to get involved with Swift, not that I have anything against it but I like other languages).

    Hear of D not familiar with nim. Will check.

    For someone who want to learn a pure object oriented language smallTalk is a good place to look to. The concept you lean there is usefull when you go to other OO language like java, c# etc.

    In the period I was using, smallTalk was written like 90% in smallTalk.

    something like :

    1 + 2

    is actually interpreted as something like this:

    An object of the type number with the property of 1 is sent a message called "+" ( you can see it as a method ) passing as a parameter an object of type number with the property of 2

    in smallTalk everything is either an object or a message to it.


    Maybe oneday I will take Smalltalk for a spin. Seems like a good llanguage to learn to learn how objects pass messages to each other, not that I know much about that.

    +==========+

    Regards,
    Tristan B. Kildaire (Deavmi)

    Email: deavmi@ewbbs.synchro.net; deavmi@kk4qbn.synchro.net

    +==========+

    ---
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  • From Mro@BBSESINF to Deavmi on Sunday, March 26, 2017 21:09:36
    Re: My language to do list
    By: Deavmi to DOVE-Net.Programming on Wed Mar 22 2017 07:07 pm

    I thought it would be a good idea to put toghether a to-do ist of
    languages to learn.

    For me I think starting at an easy high-level language like Java or
    Python is the way to go and then you work your way down to lower level languages.

    This is my hierachy of order in which I want to learn them:

    - Java
    ew

    - Python

    good for beginners.

    - D
    skip it
    ---
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  • From Deavmi@KK4QBN to Mro on Monday, March 27, 2017 14:05:36
    On 2017-03-27 04:09 AM, Mro wrote:
    Re: My language to do list
    By: Deavmi to DOVE-Net.Programming on Wed Mar 22 2017 07:07 pm

    I thought it would be a good idea to put toghether a to-do ist of languages to learn.

    For me I think starting at an easy high-level language like Java or
    Python is the way to go and then you work your way down to lower level languages.

    This is my hierachy of order in which I want to learn them:

    - Java
    ew

    - Python

    good for beginners.

    - D
    skip it
    ---
    � Synchronet � ::: BBSES.info - free BBS services :::

    I like D.

    One must have both natively compiled languages (D) and interpreted
    languages (Java and Python). That's how I and I know a lot of others feel.

    ---
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  • From Mro@BBSESINF to Deavmi on Monday, March 27, 2017 22:48:58
    Re: Re: My language to do list
    By: Deavmi to Mro on Mon Mar 27 2017 02:05 pm

    - D
    skip it

    I like D.

    blackmail material
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  • From Deavmi@KK4QBN to Mro on Tuesday, March 28, 2017 04:57:56
    What's wrong with liking the D?

    +----+----+----+----+----+----+----+----+----+----+
    Tristan B. Kildaire (deavmi@kk4qbn.synchro.net)
    Always study.
    +----+----+----+----+----+----+----+----+----+----+

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  • From Nightfox@DIGDIST to Deavmi on Monday, April 03, 2017 16:56:01
    One must have both natively compiled languages (D) and interpreted
    languages (Java and Python). That's how I and I know a lot of others feel.

    Java is compiled, not interpreted. However Java does use a sort of virtual machine, which allows you to run compiled Java code on any platform.

    Nightfox

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  • From Deavmi@KK4QBN to Nightfox on Tuesday, April 04, 2017 14:44:37
    On 2017-04-04 02:56 AM, Nightfox wrote:
    One must have both natively compiled languages (D) and interpreted
    languages (Java and Python). That's how I and I know a lot of others feel.

    Java is compiled, not interpreted. However Java does use a sort of virtual machine, which allows you to run compiled Java code on any platform.

    Nightfox

    ---
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    It is compiled but not to code that can run on a CPU (machine code) -
    unless you have a high-level architecture which is uncommon in consumer
    CPUs.

    The compiled code, Java's bytecode, runs in a virtual machine that
    interprets that code.

    Compare this to C where C does not generate bytecode but rather machine
    code for a specific platform and executes that (on the CPU).

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  • From Deavmi@KK4QBN to Nightfox on Tuesday, April 04, 2017 14:45:14
    On 2017-04-04 02:56 AM, Nightfox wrote:
    One must have both natively compiled languages (D) and interpreted
    languages (Java and Python). That's how I and I know a lot of others feel.

    Java is compiled, not interpreted. However Java does use a sort of virtual machine, which allows you to run compiled Java code on any platform.

    Nightfox

    ---
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    Python also compiles to bytecode; not machine code.

    ---
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  • From Deavmi@KK4QBN to Nightfox on Tuesday, April 04, 2017 14:46:07
    On 2017-04-04 02:56 AM, Nightfox wrote:
    One must have both natively compiled languages (D) and interpreted
    languages (Java and Python). That's how I and I know a lot of others feel.

    Java is compiled, not interpreted. However Java does use a sort of virtual machine, which allows you to run compiled Java code on any platform.

    Nightfox

    ---
    � Synchronet � Digital Distortion: digitaldistortionbbs.com



    Wikipedia:

    Bytecode, also termed portable code or p-code, is a form of
    instruction set designed for efficient execution by a software interpreter.

    The HVM or Python runtime are the interpreters for this Bytecode.

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  • From Deavmi@KK4QBN to Nightfox on Tuesday, April 04, 2017 14:53:22
    On 2017-04-04 02:56 AM, Nightfox wrote:
    One must have both natively compiled languages (D) and interpreted
    languages (Java and Python). That's how I and I know a lot of others feel.

    Java is compiled, not interpreted. However Java does use a sort of virtual machine, which allows you to run compiled Java code on any platform.

    Nightfox

    ---
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    Java gone native https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PicoJava

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  • From Nightfox@DIGDIST to Deavmi on Tuesday, April 04, 2017 12:16:21
    Re: Re: My language to do list
    By: Deavmi to Nightfox on Tue Apr 04 2017 02:45 pm

    Python also compiles to bytecode; not machine code.

    Perhaps that's more transparent than it is with Java? Typically with Python, there is no specific 'compile' step as there is with Java - When I've worked with Java, the typical use is that you run the Python code directly with the Python interpreter.

    Nightfox

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  • From jagossel@KK4QBN to Deavmi on Wednesday, April 05, 2017 01:23:22
    Re: Re: My language to do list
    By: Deavmi to Nightfox on Tue Apr 04 2017 02:45 pm

    Java is compiled, not interpreted. However Java does use a sort of virtua
    l
    machine, which allows you to run compiled Java code on any platform.

    Python also compiles to bytecode; not machine code.

    Hmmm... I'm wondering if this is becoming the norm now with langages. I know that .NET is similar, but it's called, "MSIL", not bytecode; and it's not a VM, but a CLR.

    -jag
    Code it, script it, automate it!

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  • From Deavmi@KK4QBN to Nightfox on Wednesday, April 05, 2017 15:06:35
    On 04/04/2017 22:16, Nightfox wrote:
    Re: Re: My language to do list
    By: Deavmi to Nightfox on Tue Apr 04 2017 02:45 pm

    Python also compiles to bytecode; not machine code.

    Perhaps that's more transparent than it is with Java? Typically with Python, there is no specific 'compile' step as there is with Java - When I've worked with Java, the typical use is that you run the Python code directly with the Python interpreter.

    Nightfox

    ---
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    I'd say it is transparent.

    I am aware it is not so with Java as one must invoke the compiler,
    javac, `javac hello.java` to generate the bytecode file in the form of a `.class` file and then this bytecode can be given to the VM/interpreter
    via `java hello` (which uses the `.class` file).

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  • From Deavmi@KK4QBN to jagossel on Wednesday, April 05, 2017 15:08:55
    On 05/04/2017 07:23, jagossel wrote:
    Re: Re: My language to do list
    By: Deavmi to Nightfox on Tue Apr 04 2017 02:45 pm

    Java is compiled, not interpreted. However Java does use a sort of virtua
    l
    machine, which allows you to run compiled Java code on any platform.

    Python also compiles to bytecode; not machine code.

    Hmmm... I'm wondering if this is becoming the norm now with langages. I know that .NET is similar, but it's called, "MSIL", not bytecode; and it's not a VM,
    but a CLR.

    -jag
    Code it, script it, automate it!

    In the end it is all a runtime. An interpreter. Something that runs the "bytecode" or whatever you want to call it.

    It makes sense to call it a VM some times as the JVM, uses bytecode
    which is an instruction set (not one that runs on CPUs as machine code,
    unless it is that Java CPU I talked about earlier, but that is out of
    this conversation) and therefore a machine can run the instructions
    coded in this instruction set hence the JVM.

    I just call it an interpreter or whatever.

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  • From Deavmi@KK4QBN to jagossel on Wednesday, April 05, 2017 10:51:47
    Re: Re: My language to do list
    By: jagossel to Deavmi on Wed Apr 05 2017 01:23 am

    Re: Re: My language to do list
    By: Deavmi to Nightfox on Tue Apr 04 2017 02:45 pm

    Java is compiled, not interpreted. However Java does use a sort of vir
    tua
    l
    machine, which allows you to run compiled Java code on any platform.

    Python also compiles to bytecode; not machine code.

    Hmmm... I'm wondering if this is becoming the norm now with langages. I know that .NET is similar, but it's called, "MSIL", not bytecode; and it's not a
    VM,
    but a CLR.

    -jag
    Code it, script it, automate it!

    CLR is using CIL code which is Bytecode.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Common_Language_Runtime

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    Tristan B. Kildaire (deavmi@kk4qbn.synchro.net)
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